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This page was last updated on: May 17, 2019
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The COMET Program is pleased to announce the publication of the new lesson, "Convection-allowing Models (CAMs): Winter Applications". This lesson explains how convection-allowing models (CAMs) can be used for winter weather guidance. Examples of CAMs winter weather products are described as the student moves through a winter weather case study from the Northern Plains in April 2018. Students use the CAM products to forecast the event's progress and its impact on the region.

The intended audience for Convection-allowing Models (CAMs): Winter Applications is the operational forecaster in the public or private sector with winter weather forecast responsibilities. As high-resolution NWP and its use is a relatively new topic, the lesson should also be of interest to the academic community.

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content, instructional approach, or use of this lesson. Please e-mail your comments or questions to Bill Bua (bua AT ucar.edu) or Alan Bol (alanbol AT ucar.edu). For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs.
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The COMET® Program is pleased to announce the publication of the new five-lesson "Modifying NWP Output Course”. The course is intended to increase forecasters’ skill in (1) finding mismatches between NWP output and observations and (2) making adjustments to that NWP output, with an overall goal of adding human value to model forecasts. These five short lessons provide three different approaches to make modifications to NWP forecasts, culminating in instruction for how to use Potential Vorticity as a tool to assess meso-synoptic NWP initializations.

The intended audience for "Modifying NWP Output Course” includes operational forecasters, researchers, students and others interested in increasing their skill with identifying and modifying mismatches between observations and NWP output. Please follow the links to the MetEd description page that provides additional information as well as the links to begin the lessons.

For best viewing of content on the MetEd website, please ensure that you have a browser updated to its latest version with JavaScript enabled. For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs.

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content, instructional approach, or use of this lesson. Please email your comments or questions to Bryan Guarente (guarente AT ucar.edu).
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​The COMET® Program is pleased to announce the publication of the new two-lesson "Frontal Diagnosis Course”. The course is intended to increase learners’ abilities to correctly identify different types of cold fronts and effectively diagnose their characteristics, both conceptually and from observed satellite data. The two short lessons compare and contrast three different types of fronts: Classic/Stacked fronts, Katabatic fronts, and Anabatic fronts. Throughout the lessons, learners must analyze and categorize all three types of front, along with dry conveyor belt pulses.

The intended audience for the "Frontal Diagnosis Course” includes operational forecasters, researchers, students and others interested in increasing their capabilities to identify and diagnose aspects of these three different cold frontal types in order to bring more value to their frontal analyses and forecasts. Please follow the links to the MetEd description page that provides additional information as well as the links to begin the lessons.

For best viewing of content on the MetEd website, please ensure that you have a browser updated to its latest version with JavaScript enabled. For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs.

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content, instructional approach, or use of this lesson. Please email your comments or questions to Bryan Guarente (guarente AT ucar.edu).
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The COMET Program is pleased to announce the publication of the video, "What's New in the National Blend of Models version 3.2". This short video describes the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) National Blend of Models v3.2 upgrade. This upgrade includes the first official probabilistic weather elements, along with new weather elements for: 
Aviation, 
Fire Weather, 
Water Resources, 
Winter Weather, 
Tropical Weather, and 
Marine applications. 
Version 3.2 adds several new model components and a new forecast domain for Guam. 

The intended audience for the National Blend of Models Version 3.2 video is any operational forecaster using NBM grids.

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content, instructional approach, or use of this lesson. Please e-mail your comments or questions to Bill Bua (bua AT ucar.edu). For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs.
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