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The COMET Program is pleased to announce the publication of the new lesson, "Convection-allowing Models (CAMs): Winter Applications". This lesson explains how convection-allowing models (CAMs) can be used for winter weather guidance. Examples of CAMs winter weather products are described as the student moves through a winter weather case study from the Northern Plains in April 2018. Students use the CAM products to forecast the event's progress and its impact on the region.

The intended audience for Convection-allowing Models (CAMs): Winter Applications is the operational forecaster in the public or private sector with winter weather forecast responsibilities. As high-resolution NWP and its use is a relatively new topic, the lesson should also be of interest to the academic community.

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content, instructional approach, or use of this lesson. Please e-mail your comments or questions to Bill Bua (bua AT ucar.edu) or Alan Bol (alanbol AT ucar.edu). For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs.
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The COMET® Program is pleased to announce the publication of the new five-lesson "Modifying NWP Output Course”. The course is intended to increase forecasters’ skill in (1) finding mismatches between NWP output and observations and (2) making adjustments to that NWP output, with an overall goal of adding human value to model forecasts. These five short lessons provide three different approaches to make modifications to NWP forecasts, culminating in instruction for how to use Potential Vorticity as a tool to assess meso-synoptic NWP initializations.

The intended audience for "Modifying NWP Output Course” includes operational forecasters, researchers, students and others interested in increasing their skill with identifying and modifying mismatches between observations and NWP output. Please follow the links to the MetEd description page that provides additional information as well as the links to begin the lessons.

For best viewing of content on the MetEd website, please ensure that you have a browser updated to its latest version with JavaScript enabled. For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs.

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content, instructional approach, or use of this lesson. Please email your comments or questions to Bryan Guarente (guarente AT ucar.edu).
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​The COMET® Program is pleased to announce the publication of the new two-lesson "Frontal Diagnosis Course”. The course is intended to increase learners’ abilities to correctly identify different types of cold fronts and effectively diagnose their characteristics, both conceptually and from observed satellite data. The two short lessons compare and contrast three different types of fronts: Classic/Stacked fronts, Katabatic fronts, and Anabatic fronts. Throughout the lessons, learners must analyze and categorize all three types of front, along with dry conveyor belt pulses.

The intended audience for the "Frontal Diagnosis Course” includes operational forecasters, researchers, students and others interested in increasing their capabilities to identify and diagnose aspects of these three different cold frontal types in order to bring more value to their frontal analyses and forecasts. Please follow the links to the MetEd description page that provides additional information as well as the links to begin the lessons.

For best viewing of content on the MetEd website, please ensure that you have a browser updated to its latest version with JavaScript enabled. For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs.

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content, instructional approach, or use of this lesson. Please email your comments or questions to Bryan Guarente (guarente AT ucar.edu).
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The COMET Program is pleased to announce the publication of the video, "What's New in the National Blend of Models version 3.2". This short video describes the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) National Blend of Models v3.2 upgrade. This upgrade includes the first official probabilistic weather elements, along with new weather elements for: 
Aviation, 
Fire Weather, 
Water Resources, 
Winter Weather, 
Tropical Weather, and 
Marine applications. 
Version 3.2 adds several new model components and a new forecast domain for Guam. 

The intended audience for the National Blend of Models Version 3.2 video is any operational forecaster using NBM grids.

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content, instructional approach, or use of this lesson. Please e-mail your comments or questions to Bill Bua (bua AT ucar.edu). For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs.
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The COMET® Program is pleased to announce the publication of a new video highlighting the capabilities of the upcoming FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 satellite mission, scheduled to launch in June 2019. This six-minute video, Introducing the FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 Satellite System – Next Generation Observations for Weather and Climate, is aimed at a broad public audience. 

Completed in partnership with UCP's COSMIC Program, this video provides an overview of the latest-generation Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2), based on interviews with scientists and mission planners. These experts introduce the instrumentation used and describe the collaborations that made the COSMIC-2 mission possible. They describe how COSMIC uses a technique called radio occultation--making use of existing navigation satellite signals passing through the atmosphere to provide detailed measurements of temperature, pressure, and water vapor--and explain how these data contribute to exciting improvements in numerical weather prediction, hurricane forecasts, climate studies, and analysis of space weather affecting communication networks and other systems on Earth. 

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content or use of this video. Please e-mail your comments or questions to Lon Goldstein (longold AT ucar.edu) or Amy Stevermer (asteverm AT ucar.edu). For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs.
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The COMET Program is pleased to announce the publication of an update to the MetEd Operational Models Encyclopedia for the Global Forecast System (GFS) model, including the finite volume 3-dimensional (FV3) dynamical core. This GFS upgrade, the first to use the FV3 core, was made operational at 12 UTC 11 June 2019. Besides the new dynamical core, the microphysics scheme was upgraded to directly predict precipitation, and the land surface model (LSM) was altered to reduce a high bias in surface soil layer evaporation. 

The intended audience for the MetEd Operational Models Encyclopedia includes operational public and private sector users of numerical weather prediction models. This new entry will be of particular interest to those using GFS in the forecast process. Colleges and universities with synoptic and dynamic meteorology courses may find the content in the Encyclopedia useful as a learning tool as well.

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content, instructional approach, or use of this lesson. Please e-mail your comments or questions to Bill Bua (bua AT ucar.edu). For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs.
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The COMET Program is pleased to announce the publication of the new lesson, "GOES-16/JPSS Case Exercise: Monitoring the Rhea Oklahoma Grassland Fire". Given the extensive economic, health, and safety impacts as well as the increased impacts of wildland fires, the new capabilities available from current GOES-R and JPSS satellite remote sensing technologies will aid in fire detection and provide more effective monitoring of fire evolution, smoke and other related impacts.

This lesson provides the opportunity for forecasters and others to become more familiar with the enhanced capability and utility of newer satellite products through interpretation activities and interactions based in the context of the April 2018 Oklahoma Rhea grassland fire. This 0.75-hour lesson follows the detection, spread, and evolution of the Rhea Fire over its first couple of days.

The intended audience for GOES-16/JPSS Case Exercise: Monitoring the Rhea Oklahoma Grassland Fire is any operational meteorologist, including IMETs, and others needing to use satellite information for fire/smoke detection and monitoring. The lesson should also appeal to individuals from emergency operation centers and others (fire and land management agency personnel, USFS and state forestry fire behavior analysts) with interest in detecting and monitoring fires.

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content, instructional approach, or use of this lesson. Please e-mail your comments or questions to Patrick Dills (dills AT ucar.edu) or Tony Mancus (tmancus AT ucar.edu). For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs.
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The COMET Program is pleased to announce the publication of the new lesson, "The Forecast Process: Using the Forecast Funnel". The lesson is a somewhat broad brush review of the overall forecast process, but with specific application of the forecast funnel approach as used by Australia's Bureau of Meteorology (BoM). 

The forecast process components of the lesson include decision support and communication, use of numerical weather prediction, and applying the forecast funnel approach. The forecast funnel is described in detail, along with the forecaster time pyramid, and it is applied using a BoM forecast policy example. 

This 2-hour lesson was written by Dr. Mick Pope of The Bureau of Meteorology Training Centre and is intended for introductory-level forecasters and for students in meteorology.

We welcome any comments or questions you may have regarding the content, instructional approach, or use of this lesson. Please e-mail your comments or questions to Alan Bol (alanbol AT ucar.edu) or Matt Kelsch (kelsch AT ucar.edu). For technical support, please visit our Registration and Support FAQs
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